Te-angie Herefords produces winners with traditional and modern techniques | farm online

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VISION: In their Te-angie Poll Hereford Stud herd, the Ogilvie family breeds toward an animal that will perform in the feedlot or fairway, with constant attention to structure, IMF, EMA and docility.

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Poll Hereford breeding has been the name of the game for the Ogilivie family since they purchased their first commercial females in 1954.

Today, Richard and Kerryn Ogilvie run their operations on three separate properties in the Wongwibinda district, 70km northeast of Armidale, New South Wales, with their son Michael and his partner Claire.

The Te-angie Poll Hereford Stud, which is a herd of 450 registered females, resides on their Te-angie property, which they purchased in 2013 after moving from Robe, South Australia. They have since purchased Forestlodge and Westwood in 2017, located 3 miles east of Te-angie.

Mr. Ogilivie established his Poll Hereford stud as Spotshill in South Africa 18 years ago, and when he brought it also to Te-angie he changed the name of the stud to reflect the new family property.

“Moving to SA has been a change of location for me and an adventure that has left me perplexed at times, especially in 2019. We have just regained our footing after the drought of 2019, so for now we will be running with a stable at the approach of the sails,” he said.

Origins: Mr Ogilivie established his Poll Hereford stud as Spotshill in South Africa 18 years ago and when he also brought it to Te-angie he changed the name of the stud to reflect the new family property.

In the stud field, Ogilvies breed to an animal that will perform in the feedlot or fairway, with constant attention paid to structure, IMF, EMA and tameness .

“We incorporate a combination of traditional breeding, genomics and high percentage backed EBV into our breeding program. Since 2017 all my breeding stock has been DNA tested and sire and dam verified.”

He said it had been difficult to turn back the tide of black consciousness.

“I think the Hereford breed may have taken a nap at the wheel, but there is a gradual return to the breed as people have become aware of the loss of weight and fertility of their mature cows. We get a lot of interest from breeders of all breeds of cattle at the shows we attend.”

This interest was evidenced by Ogilivies’ great success in the show ring both locally and at the Sydney Royal Show and Ekka.

“We have only been showing for two years at Ekka and have won the Junior Bull Champion title twice and last year we won the most successful Hereford breeder title and then we won the most successful Hereford breeder successful at Sydney Royal last year.At local shows we have won the Champion All Breeds Exhibit on several occasions.

This year, the Ogilvies will offer 45 fully DNA-tested two-year-old bulls at their annual Te-angie bull sale to be held August 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the property at Forestlodge.

Traditionally a fine merino wool country, the introduction of permanent pasture on the Te-angie has seen a transformation of the country and its carrying capacity.

QUALITY FEMALES: The Ogilvies stud business consists of a herd of 450 head of registered females.

Mr Ogilvie said their rainfall this year was “a bit exaggerated”, especially after the drought and bushfires of 2019, with the country looking “an absolute picture” and their livestock “growing”.

Along with the Te-Angie stud business, the Ogilivies also raise 1000 crossbred ewes, which lamb every nine months, at 150%.

“We are also rebuilding our Hereford commercial breeding herd. On Forestlodge and Westwood we put out 2000 cattle of feedlot weight each year. I like the calmness and fertility of the Hereford. It shows when I work the cattle crossed in the paddock or the building sites.”

This is branded content for Te-angie Herefords.

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